About

Objectives
Our objectives this symposium are similar to previous meetings in Santa Monica (2019), Indian Rocks Beach (2018), San Diego (2016), San Francisco (2014), and Philadelphia (2012).

Anthelmintics V will be held the University of Massachusetts Medical School, on May 10-12, 2022. It is a lovely venue, and there is plenty to explore in the area.

Organizers
Richard Martin (Iowa State University) and Raffi Aroian (University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School)

The BASICS:

  1. THE MEETING IS IN PERSON ONLY.
  2. ABSTRACTS DUE BEFORE APRIL 21ST, 2022.
  3. REGISTER FOR THE SYMPOSIUM
    THERE IS A $150 DELEGATE FEE (LABELLED REGISTRATION) FOR BREAKFASTS, COFFEE, TEAS, FINGER FOOD AND DRINKS. REGISTER BY APRIL 18TH TO BE INCLUDED IN THE SYMPOSIUM.
  4. TRAVEL AWARDS FOR GRAD STUDENTS: Please send applications to rjmartin@iastate.edu with supporting letter from major professor with travel costs. Depending on the number of applications we receive, we anticipate support up to $500 travel reimbursement.

We will review recent progress in anthelmintic drug development, medicinal chemistry, modes of action of anthelmintic drugs, and how resistance to anthelmintic drugs emerges. At this meeting we are including vaccine development and studies including them as Anthelmintics. We are interested in the helminth parasite infections of humans and animals, including flatworms, tapeworms, filaria and roundworms. We also recognize the importance of experimental models and include studies of anthelmintics on C. elegans. We also seek to train and encourage graduate students and post-docs in these fields of research so we have made an extra effort to invite early researchers the program.

Our biannual meetings on anthelmintics are driven by scientific and medical needs that arise from the now established ambitious use of anthelmintics and future vaccines for controlling and eliminating human helminth infections with Mass Drug Administration (MDA) and similar extensive use in animals. This continuous use has led to concerns about the development of resistance and the need for novel compounds to overcome that resistance in most of the helminth species. We recognize that there is real medical need to develop new anthelmintics and vaccines and to address concerns about resistance but to do so successfully requires new technology, new science and training of graduates and post-docs.

In addition to our invited speakers, we are seeking to include presentations from the community on: New Research Approaches; Schistosomes and Flatworms; Filaria and Heartworms; Soil-Transmitted Helminths; Drug and Vaccine Development; Anthelmintic Resistance.

Questions that we are seeking to answer at our meeting:

  1. How do we develop new and more effective anthelmintics and vaccines for the future?
  2. What new techniques and approaches can we use to detect resistance?
  3. Can we find out more about how drugs and vaccines work so that we can use them optimally and synergistically?

Goals:

  • We intend to promote training and learning of graduate and post-doc researchers of current and new techniques required for the multidisciplinary approach required for anthelmintic drug and vaccine discovery and the design of sustainable control programs.
  • We want to stimulate communication between medical and veterinary parasitologists and to bring together academic and industrial scientists working to discover and develop novel anthelmintic drugs. There is an increasing consensus that novel anthelmintics will be needed if the goals of the London Declaration are to be met. Albendazole, the frequently used drug for STHs is only 28% effective against Trichuris infection and mebendazole is little better (36%) based on cure rates. Mebendazole has little activity against hookworm, and the cure rate with albendazole is 72%, which is less than optimal. There is renewed interest in oxantel that was developed for the treatment of Trichuris in humans and has a selective agonist effect on Trichuris ACR-16 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.
  • There is also a pressing need for drugs that are effective at safely removing adult filarial parasites (lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis) from infected people. These parasites live for many years inside the human host, and require multiple doses with existing drugs to be killed. For trematodes, which include schistosomes and the food-borne flatworms prevalent in Asia, control depends on one drug, praziquantel, and alternatives are urgently required. New discoveries about the mode of action of praziquantel on TRPMpzq channels are a significant development. Tapeworms also remain as a problem, which in humans usually cause few symptoms, they can cause serious and life-endangering problems. New bioinformatic methods for capturing and interpreting the significance of the genomic information from a wide range of parasites are required.
  • We recognize that commercial support and interests play a very big role in the success and delivery of anthelmintic therapy and so we are very pleased to welcome scientists from private companies to our meeting. Recent developments in private/public partnerships have allowed a synergism that has benefited science, medical health and commercial interests.